Subscribe
Call Us : 1-778-386-5167

The Art of Mentoring

Mentoring is a developmental partnership. It’s a mutual commitment to bring out the best in the other person. It calls forth new possibilities through the flow of meaning in relationship based on mutual respect and trust.

As you watch the two videos below, reflect on the Think about it questions after each video.

1. Dan Pink – The surprising truth about what motivates us

Please view this video from the POV (Point of View) of a leader and mentor of others.

Bidding adieu to his last “real job” as Al Gore’s speechwriter, Dan Pink went freelance to spark a right-brain revolution in the career marketplace.
Career analyst Dan Pink examines the puzzle of motivation, starting with a fact that social scientists know but most managers don’t: Traditional rewards aren’t always as effective as we think. Listen for illuminating stories — and maybe, a way forward. [10:46]

Think about it

1- If the traditional view of reward and punishment does not work, what areas do you need to focus on as a mentor of others?
2- Dan Pink says some traditional management approaches are great if you want compliance. What does he mean and how is this true in your area of work?
3- He identifies engagement as the goal. As a mentor, why is this significant and so important?
4- Dan Pink identifies three aspects of motivation that are critical. What are they? Why are these three aspects so important?
5- How important are these three motivators for you in your job, and as a mentor?


2. Simon Sinek – Why good leaders make you feel safe

Please view this video from the POV (Point of View) of a leader and mentor of others.

What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust. But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility. (11:55)

Think about it
1- What does Sinek mean by getting the environment right?
2- How does Sinek’s model of danger apply to your situation as a mentor – current and future?
3- What do you think about his concept of head counts and heart counts? How does this apply to your current area of work? And as a mentor?
4- What do you think about his idea of safety in the circle, or organization? What makes employees feel safe?
5- What do you think about his idea of leadership? How can you apply this concept to your context – and as a mentor?


3. Carol Dweck – The power of believing that you can improve

Please view this video from the POV (Point of View) of a leader and mentor of others. Note: This video is not dynamic in presentation style but has lots of interesting things for you to note as a leader and mentor of others.

Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain’s capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.

As Carol Dweck describes it: “My work bridges developmental psychology, social psychology, and personality psychology, and examines the self-conceptions (or mindsets) people use to structure the self and guide their behavior. My research looks at the origins of these mindsets, their role in motivation and self-regulation, and their impact on achievement and interpersonal processes.”

Dweck is a professor at Stanford and the author of Mindset, a classic work on motivation and “growth mindset.” Her work is influential among educators and increasingly among business leaders as well. (10:20)

Premise

The world is divided between people who are open to learning and those who are closed to it, and this trait affects everything from your worldview to your interpersonal relationships. Dweck addresses the ways that mindsets have an impact on people. She explains that you can have a closed mindset in regard to some traits and an open mindset in regard to others. The thought-provoking insight comes from learning when you need to adjust your mindset to move ahead. The author extends her basic point by viewing all areas of human relationships through the prism of mindset, including leadership and management.

Action plan

1- Find three areas in your life in which you think you have [or have had] a fixed mindset – don’t censor these, let them bubble up. Please document them so we can discuss. If nothing comes up, ask a trusted friend.
Reflect on why you think you have a fixed mindset about these areas, actions, topics, taboos etc.
2- How can you apply this self-insight to your role as a mentor?
3- Find three areas in your life in which you know you have [or have had] a learning mindset. Reflect on why you think you have [or have had] a learning mindset about these areas, actions, topics, taboos etc.
4- How can you apply this self-insight to your role as a mentor?
5- When the people you are mentoring have experienced a series of challenges and closed doors, what can you do as a mentor to help them focus on a growth curve?


4. Steven Johnson: Where good ideas come from

Please view this video from the POV (Point of View) of a leader and mentor of others.

People often credit their ideas to individual “Eureka!” moments. But Steven Johnson shows how history tells a different story. His fascinating tour takes us from the “liquid networks” of London’s coffee houses to Charles Darwin’s long, slow hunch to today’s high-velocity web. (4:06)

Think about it
Steven Johnson illustrates how ideas are cobbled together – how they fade into reality over a long period of time.

1- How can you influence the people you are mentoring to generate an idea that pushes their career and the organization forward?
2- What idea were you able to implement with the help of a colleague, mentor or coach?


5. Margaret Heffernan: Forget the pecking order at work

Organizations are often run according to “the superchicken model,” where the value is placed on star employees who outperform others. And yet, this isn’t what drives the most high-achieving teams. Business leader Margaret Heffernan observes that it is social cohesion — built every coffee break, every time one team member asks another for help — that leads over time to great results. It’s a radical rethink of what drives us to do our best work, and what it means to be a leader. Because as Heffernan points out: “Companies don’t have ideas. Only people do.”

Think about it
1- Heffernan tells about the research of William Muir and flocks of chickens. The most productive chickens were called . . . ?
2- After six generations, the individually productive chickens had only achieved their success by suppressing the productivity of the rest. What was the productivity of the so called “average group” of chickens after six generations?
3- What is the point of her story?
4- Based on research done at MIT, what three qualities do groups have that make them more successful than others?
5- Heffernan mentions that the key to their success is . . . ?
6- What does this mean for your role as a mentor at work?
7- She talks about the coffee-break concept of “fika” that is practised by the Swedes. What does it mean?
8- How can you make this work for you as a mentor?
9- Heffernan talks about when the going gets tough, successful people are motivated by . . . ?
10- Based on this, what do you have to spend a lot of time doing?
11- She says social capital is the reliance and interdependency that builds . . . ?
12- She also mentions people that work together longer get better, because it takes time to develop the trust you need for real . . . and . . . ?
13- Another key point, “Conflict is frequent because . . . is safe?
14- Talking about superstars, she says it’s outstanding collaborators who enjoy long careers because . . . ? (This is the key point)
15- Start thinking how you can do more of this (the key point) as a mentor.


The Pulse

Education events and interviews The Pulse

The Art of Mentoring

Exploring possibility in relationship
INTERESTED?

Mentoring is a commitment to bring out the best in the other person. It calls forth new possibilities through the flow of meaning in relationship based on mutual respect and trust.

Program details

Address

483-1641 Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver,
Canada V7M 2J5
Phone: +1 (778) 386.5167
Website: www.possibil.com
Contact us
Can we help?
Your message was successfully sent!



1 + 4 =

Twitter